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President Wilson noted that government should follow Darwinian theory rather than Newtonian laws — and exhalting its ability to adapt to the times:

“Some single law, like the law of gravitation, swung each system of thought and gave it its principle of unity. The trouble with the theory is that government is not a machine, but a living thing. It falls, not under the theory of the universe, but under the theory of organic life. It is accountable to Darwin, not to Newton. …


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When you’re on the saddle all-day, it can be meditative at times, but more often than not, I’d go crazy without some external stimulation. Audiobooks, podcasts, and Norwegian audio lessons became my natural means of passing the time.

St. Louis had always been a destination I’d been looking forward to as symbolically it was the Gateway to West. After an afternoon waiting out the 95ºF heat in the Missouri History Museum — and I had become fascinated with the Lewis and Clark expedition, the preparation, gear, and the mission to explore westward trails.

As I departed St. Louis, I rolled…


Riding the Line: Experiments, Notes, and Hacks of an Engineer Biking Across America

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I descended through Winter State Park, Pennsylvania having summited my last climb of the day of the Appalachians into a 40-mile long valley. I continued cycling and it looked like most of the farmland I’d seen before — only with some more wagon wheels than one would expect. I was moving at a good clip at that point, and found myself approaching this in the road:


Riding the Line: Experiments, Notes, and Hacks of an Engineer Biking Across America

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After learning that Balancing on the White Line was a way to combat fluctuations in road conditions, I was starting to feel a sense of control over my daily ride. In the Eastern part of the US, state routes and sheltered rail-trails meandered through the cover of forests, but as I emerged into the open, Great Plains, Kansas had something else in store for me.

Wind.

On a windless day, I was averaging 13–14 miles per hour. But here I was in Beloit, Kansas, tucked in the aero position, furiously pedaling in my first ring — usually reserved for climbing…


Experiments, Notes, and Hacks of an Engineer Biking Across America

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I had intentionally placed my speedometer on my top tube, off of my handlebars keep it out of sight, but after a few days on the bike, it’s hard not to be tempted to gaze down and continuously check your speed.

After the undulations of the Pennsylvania hills (AKA the Appalachians), I thought the relatively flat roads of Ohio and Indiana would be smooth sailing. My daily average speed would hover somewhere around 13–14 mph, but the variation was +/-5 mph at any given time. …

Gihan Amarasiriwardena

Curious Tinkerer. Engineer, Designer and Entrepreneur. Avid endurance runner and cyclist. Co-founder, Ministry of Supply

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